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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. . with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. >> i wish to yield one minute to the speaker of the house, the honorable, john boehner. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the speaker. the speaker: let me thank my colleague for yielding and i rise in strong support of h.r. 6604 and commend my colleague, the gentlelady from california, ms. pelosi, for sponsoring this resolution. tip o'neill needs no introduction to this body. those respect and admire tip's record, and his long shadow he cast over the people's house. we all know his best known fame, all politics is local. it's certainly true today as we propose to name a building right here at the foot of capitol hill, a stone's throw from this great dome, in honor the our 55th speaker. this is one of those moments when you wonder how the honoree would feel. especially when it's someone like tip who never quite held back his opinions. perhaps he would have enjoyed seeing leaders from opposite sides of the aisle come together to give him a well deserved hurrah. surely he would have go
the pentagon is facing. california's vote for higher taxes for schools. carter evans talks to teachers and kids. >> we want to have a good life, we want to have great careers. >> jeff: and on this veteran's day lee cowan hears from parents who lost their only child to a man wearing an afghan army uniform. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." good evening, everyone, i'm jeff glor, two days after the abrupt resignation of cia director david petraeus more details are emerging about the chain of events that lead to his depar ture. we begin tonight with bob orr in washington. >> good luck, sir. >> reporter: sources say the down fall of cia director david petraeus was rooted in jealousy. the f business, uncovered evidence of an affair between petraeus and his biographer paula broadwell after she sent harassing messages to another woman who broadwell thought was too close to petraeus. source have identified the second woman as 37-year-old jill kelley of the tampa area. cbs news has been told kelley is a civilian without does work for the u.s. central command. petraeus headed the
from mississippi. caller: i am a retired firefighter from mississippi -- from california. disasters, and most jurisdictions find they are overwhelmed by the time of happens, because disasters over what every jurisdiction. whether you are in new york or mississippi, the jurisdictions in charge of tried to mitigate the problems are so overwhelmed, and most of them are victims themselves. we need a national fire disaster program that exist within the federal cover that. the resources are there with a going to a lot of expense. all disasters are similar to what would happen in a hotel. if everyone goes into a hotel, they see what to happen when a fire starts, how to get out. once they are out, they need to be accounted for, and you need to have in the emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police and fire -- when it comes to things that have to do with police, we have the fbi that is a national organization that has the resources to do things that the local to restrictions, whether state or l
california, ron waiting to talk to us. caller: good morning. good job. the issues are occluded. the whole congress -- i blame the entire congress for holding americans hostage for this results. this is not space science. we're not trying to go to pluto. we are trying to fix something of a vote of 425 people we have to convince. this is ridiculous. the price of health care is doubling as a first of the year. that has nothing to do with the fiscal cliff. that is congress not paying attention to what's going on with health care. they are blaming obamacare on this, but this was before the election the price of health care was going up. across the board, we are not dealing with problems at hand. both sides of the aisle, those that don't want to give an answer to this before we go over the fiscal cliff, they're not responding to the will of the people. they will be voted out. there's no doubt. if we have some very lovely and caring republicans that are very conservative and we love them, but we will vote them out if they don't fix this. we are holding them responsible as we are holding the demo
. republican losses tended to be a california and illinois where democrats redistricted against republican incumbent. so people you thought my is what with the tide -- might be swept out with the tide were not. republicans like to have a 10 year run because of detecting -- because of redistricting. republicans have touched the third real. you have better republicans back now, all of whom had to answer 100 questions about the ryan plan and block granting and medicare and survived. the new guys have to face the same question in. i would argue you have a republican party that not only touched the third round rail and did not end up where all the smart people knew you would end up if you discussed and talk of reform. and now 10 years of the republican house committed to these reforms. all the things people flail about. republicans have passed the budget on the subject in the house. obama's budget does that do any of the things you what it did it -- a budget to do over the next decade. those of the two competing mandates. obama, at first you get this i won re-election, i'm king, and then as eve
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
and it is a real problem. part of it is the state of california and how it's structured to take claims. but the insurance companies, you know, the point is the cost of workers compensation for our little league as they had to go through the state senate was about 1.5 times the entire compensation of the players and we had a conversation recently with the national football league and i think if you asked them, they would tell you it's a similar program. why is a problem? they think of inheriting a word player played last, the whole thing and nobody objects of course because there are players that have been hurt. if you go back and say you want change this, you and up were dr. cantu is talking about. and then i say wow, we basically have an entire generation we have to deal with because who knows somebody in the southeast conference has perhaps already occurred tmh that isn't going to manifest itself in 15 or 20 years. >> i think you were telling me that the last team that employs the player is the one that picks up all the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be
as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment crews, etc., here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. and one of the things that we have been able to do, just to give you a sense of how this is an all hands deck approach, we're able to get c-17's, c-130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. and so we are going to be working with governor christi's office to identify the critical infrastructure and how we can get what's needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and in other places where transportati
of san francisco, california killed a man with his car, but got to stay in the united states. that is the story of robert gallow, an immigrant from honduras, who on november 16, 2010, hit 25-year-old drew rosen burg with his car. gallow proceed to do drive over his victim, killing him at the scene. now drew's father has been working tirelessly to get gallow deported when he's released from prison on friday, but has found the laws are not on gallow's side. -- they are on gallow's side. joining us from l.a. is don rosenberg and here is our studio, peter johnson, jr. don, thank you for joining us. we're sorry about the loss of your son. tell us what happened that day in 2010 with drew and mr. goal low. >> well, my son was a second year law student in san francisco. he was coming home from school on his motorcycle riding very slowly. it was rush hour traffic. gallow, at the last second tried to make a left-hand turn and hit him in the intersection. i believe that the original collision didn't kill my son. they were both going very slowly. gallow then accelerated and drove over my
it as something right out of a tabloid. joining us now from capitol hill, senator dianne feinstein of california. she's the chair of the senate intelligence committee. senator, thanks very much for joining us. >> you're welcome, wolf. >> we've spoken on many occasions. i am tempted to throw my hands in the air and simply ask you what is going on now. we're waking up every morning to these new revelations. i have been around washington a long time, you have as well. they're pretty shocking. give us your immediate gut. what is going on. >> my immediate gut is like this is the national enquirer. i mean, every day there is something new, and that really does not affect what we're doing, it may add to it somewhat, but what the intelligence committee will begin tomorrow is an inquiry into the benghazi episode. we will have mr. morell, mr. olson of the counter terrorism center as well as the number two of the fbi, sean joyce, and in that way we will be able to cover that. it is also my intention that this has not yet been announced to talk with general petraeus, director petraeus. this ties into his tr
stories today. now california congressman darrell issa who oversees d.c. affairs is asking the district and federal national capital planning commission to help decidetaller buildings could be constructed in the city. at a surprise birthday party wednesday for mayor gray, the head of the council's revenue committee, welcomed the new year's long study but with caution. >> what i want to avoid is a crystal city, where you have the monolithic buildings. >> reporter: he suggested new york avenue could be away from neighborhoods. some citizens in the district worry the iconic skyline would be changed by the higher builds. they stress that residential neighborhoods and the city's extensive monumental core would be protected from larger buildings that could change the character of the city. >> if you built a 20-story building, which is going to impact the air, light, things of that nature, would that have a detrimental effect on your quality of life and hence you wouldn't build it. st. elizabeth's, people talk about it all the time. if people do not support the idea, i wouldn't support it eith
, a cash-strapped city in california will embark on a curious modern experiment. san jose's citizens will be invited to play with the city's budge for a day using pretend money. the hope is that by logging into these computing-cum-budget exercises, residents will become better informed about how their budget and city work, and that, in turn, should make them more engaged in crucial policy choices. should the city save money by reducing its firemen on trucks or bite the bullet and raise taxes instead? a cynic might dismiss this as a marketing or political gimmick, but if nothing else, the experiment is distinctly thought-provo thought-provoking." i'm curious your thoughts because in your essay you also talk about switzerland. they obviously face unique comparisons to the united states. we're a far larger cannot tri wi country with a lot more poverty than they face. what is your belief of why it would work here? >> it's been tried in brazil, but the idea is you get people at a local level together to understand the importance of tradeoffs. if you ask people in surveys, what do you want
this statement to a group of college students in southern california. >> we are here to talk about education but i want to say something. education -- if you make it most it and study hard and do your homework and make an effort to be smart, you can do well. if you don't you get stuck in iraq. >> reporter: the criticism to that was loud and it was often. john considery said he botched that joke, he did not mean to be critical of the soldiers serving in iraq. he meant that to be aimed at president bush. megyn: i'm joined by andy card, the former white house chief of staff under president bush. andy, welcome back to you. so there are obviously some changes i assume second term for the president we talked about. holder, we talked about hillary clinton will go, and the reports that senator kerry would be tapped for secretary of defense are going to get some pushback for the same reasons we just saw trace outline in that report. your thoughts on it. >> i think the president deserves the benefit of the doubt when it comes to what people he wants to serve in his cabinet or his immediate staff at th
. panetta has been working on these issues for quite some time with you and the area in central california. by the way, thank you for support on the veterans skills jon that was assigned this week into the law a good bipartisan effort that we worked on. after our afghanistan try and another issue that came up during the same trip was working with our veterans that on the active duty with the general bostick afterwards he had said that this is the number one issue the evaluation process before they get discharged making sure not a day goes by that they are having to wait for disability or the issue of 20,000 non-deployable men and women that are disabled on active duty, so he said was the number-one issue dealing with the legislative issue that needs to be fixed back in 1940 and the question that i would have to you is what can we get done and what would be your recommendation and what is the legislative fix that you need us to pass the would help with this overall disability evaluation system? >> my view is that one of the most important things we can do is address the wounded warriors and
to set up offices in chicago, first of all, or california, and i don't know who are the people who are going to staff and man those offices to actually trade on behalf of somebody, it's not clear to me how this works. it may very well be that when you have a massive superstorm the size of sandy that knocks out an entire coast or region that it's almost impossible to have true contingency planning. >> two things. good point. first of all, you do need to have some senior people who aren't necessarily located in the proximity of devastation. yes, you do need some senior people but in this circumstance, this is one of the things we learned, andrew, is that since they weren't sure the large traders weren't sure about whether or not they could enter the orders into the new york stock exchange, they actually sent people to archipelago to try to work on the computers, in the middle of this storm, so just a really sort of a cluster and hopefully we can do better in the future. >> what happened to your own next -- isn't this a transatlantic company that has platforms on both sides of the oce
and california. they make the decisions. the politics you see on the media which they own and manipulate and make believe the two parties which are really one party, the donkeys face an elephant face, and i am running to reveal the truth about all of these so we can deal with reality instead of the fake democracy. sanders: it's the economy. we have almost 15% of working people in this country that are either unemployed or underemployed and 50 million people with no health insurance and median family income has gone down by some $4,000 in the last ten years. i am going to work very hard to continue my efforts for the millions of jobs that our country desperately needs by rebuilding our infrastructure and putting a whole lot of people back to work building the roads and the water systems and the bridges. we've got to transform our energy system away from fossil fuel, energy efficiency and sustainable energy when you do that you create a lot of jobs and we need to free think our disastrous trade policies which have led to the outsourcing of millions of jobs and we have to take on wall street and get
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)